35+ TRAINING CERTIFICATIONS

FMCSA compliant training and certifications for supervisors and drivers are included in FMCSAFETY client services. Each class comes with an introduction, a list of FMCSRs the class applies to, the training outline, exercises, handouts, and quiz. Quiz answers will be emailed separately to the instructor overseeing the class.

SUPERVISOR TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS

CSA Supervisor Training

All parties employed by a motor carrier who are responsible for safety compliance need to be aware of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) enforcement program from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). This is especially true of safety managers who play a vital role in running an effective and efficient operation that ultimately affects a motor carrier’s scores in the CSA program. This training program is a review of the basic hours of service requirements found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), as they apply to property-carrying vehicles. This program will help the supervisor gain a reasonable understanding of the hours of service regulations in order to improve scheduling and productivity pertaining to drivers.

Driver Retention Training

Retention is becoming a significant issue in the trucking industry. A common goal for all carriers is to overcome this challenge. While this is a noble goal, many carriers do not perform and execute formal retention training with the individuals who have the most control over this matter, the frontline supervisors that have day-to-day contact with the drivers. This session is intended to provide basic insight into methods that will improve driver retention. However, the core concepts can be modified and enhanced to improve retention among all employees at a carrier.

Employee Security

Motor carriers in the wake of 9/11 have to be aware of numerous facets of their operations.  Unusual events need to be reported and investigated immediately.  Every employee whether in the office or on the loading docks, needs to be trained in what is considered suspicious activity, how to report the information, and to whom.

Facility Security

Many intruders to a motor carrier will use the exception to the rule to gain access into a facility.  Any little detail left undone, or carelessly forgotten, can literally leave the door open to theft. Management and employees both need to keep their eyes and ears open. Having an exceptionally secure facility means being exceedingly attentive to every detail. 

Forklift Safety Training

A versatile machine found in virtually every facility is the forklift, or powered industrial truck, as OSHA calls it. Although it is quite a useful tool, the forklift is involved in countless workplace injuries and accidents that result in property damage and machine downtime. These injuries and accidents are typically due to improper use. Therefore, OSHA mandates the training and evaluation of all operators regarding the safe and proper use of forklifts. OSHA estimates that there are 998,671 industrial trucks in use and that there are about 1.5 million operators. There have been, on average, 101 fatalities and 94,570 injuries annually due to unsafe powered industrial truck operation. OSHA estimates that the revised training requirements will prevent approximately 11 deaths and 9,422 injuries each year. Both OSHA and the Bureau of Labor Statistics have data indicating that vehicle tip overs are the primary cause of fatal or serious forklift accidents. Other common types of accidents include being crushed between the vehicle and a surface, being struck by the vehicle, being struck by falling material, falling from a platform on the forks, and running the vehicle off a loading dock or other surface. Most accidents are caused by errors, and studies have shown that enhanced training reduces operator errors.

Hours-of-Service Training

Experienced drivers should have a strong understanding of the hours of service regulations. In order for supervisors to be conscious of the daily various stresses placed on drivers, they too need to know and understand the hours of service regulations. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. This training program is a review of the basic hours of service requirements found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), as they apply to property-carrying vehicles. This course will help the supervisor obtain a reasonable understanding of the hours of service regulations in order to improve scheduling and productivity pertaining to drivers.

Log Auditing

Under the federal hours-of-service rules, failure to complete the record of duty status (driver’s daily log), failure to preserve the record, or making false reports on the record is illegal, making both the driver and his/her carrier being held liable for prosecution. The best way to make sure logs are being maintained properly is by performing a regular audit of drivers’ logs. This training program will cover the basics of efficiently and effectively auditing logs for drivers of property-carrying commercial motor vehicles.

Maintenance Requirements

Maintenance allows the carrier’s most important material assets to remain profitable. Without maintenance the carrier’s equipment cannot continue to operate, turn a profit, and is at risk of being decommissioned during a roadside inspection. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration regulations provide guidance on how to operate a successful maintenance program and establish the maintenance requirements. A carrier’s maintenance program is evaluated on the roadway during roadside inspections conducted by law enforcement officers as well as part of a compliance review conducted by FMCSA officials. If a vehicle is found to be noncompliant during a roadside inspection, the officer may place the vehicle out of service. This would require the vehicle to be repaired before it is operational again, delaying delivery and potentially leading to customer service problems. As part of a compliance review, the carrier’s roadside inspection performance will be reviewed, as will the carrier’s overall maintenance program. If the maintenance program is found unsatisfactory during such review, the carrier is one step closer to being rated as an unsatisfactory carrier. This session is intended to familiarize supervisors with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration maintenance requirements. Once familiar with these requirements, personnel can successfully construct a maintenance program that is both compliant and effective.

Mandatory Drug & Alcohol Certification Training

Section 382.603 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) states that all people who are designated to supervise drivers must receive at minimum 60 minutes of training on alcohol misuse and an additional 60 minutes of training on drug use. This training will be used by supervisors to determine whether reasonable suspicion exists that would require a driver to undergo testing under Sec. 382.307 of the FMCSRs. The training must include the physical, behavioral, speech, and performance indicators of probable alcohol misuse and use of controlled substances.

Risk Management

Risk management is a significant issue in the trucking industry. Many carriers cease operation because of poor risk management practices. These carriers go out of business due to a substantial loss to an unknown or unprotected risk that became a loss, or the inability to get insurance after becoming a “high-risk” carrier. A common goal for all carriers should be to control risks in such a way that a single incident cannot damage the company and the carrier does not become a high-risk carrier. This session is intended to provide some basic training on risk management principles and practices. It is important that the carrier develop a comprehensive risk management program. The program should clearly state that all employees are responsible for controlling risk.

Slips, Trips, & Falls

Though it may seem inconsequential, a slip, trip, or fall should be taken seriously. The consequences may be more severe than you think. Something as simple as a driver missing a step into his/her cab, an icy parking lot, or a wet warehouse floor can cause an accident. This accident can result in an injury requiring time away from work.

Supervisor Training: The Basics

The Supervisory training program outlines the transition from being an associate to becoming a leader. It discusses the three paradigm shifts a new leader needs to make in terms of value, time, and skills. The program also introduces participants to two critical skills new supervisors must develop to be effective in their new role: 1) Effective use of time to ensure time is spent with associates while balancing the competing demands placed on them. 2) The ability to prepare employees so as to ensure the successful obtainment of business goals.

Train The Trainer

Training has become a key issue in the trucking industry. A common objective for all carriers is to improve the quality of their driving corps, from the newly hired drivers to the drivers with many years of experience. To accomplish this goal, a carrier must have a quality staff of trainers. This session is intended to provide some basic education for a new trainer. However, the basic concepts presented can be modified and added to, to improve the quality of the training personnel at a carrier. It is important that the carrier develop a cohesive training program for the trainers to follow. The training program should clearly state what the training objectives are for each core competency area the carrier wants training conducted in.

Vehicle Inspection Training

Parts 392 and 396 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR) address the subject of vehicle inspection. All motor carriers and drivers who operate commercial motor vehicles fall under these regulations. Part 396 of the FMCSR requires pre-trip and post-trip inspections on each vehicle a driver is assigned to drive. The idea behind the requirement is to put safer vehicles on the road as a way to help prevent accidents. A thorough inspection can also help a driver avoid mechanical breakdowns and unwanted “downtime.” This training program will address the basics or pre-trip and post-trip inspections as well as on the road inspection rules.

DRIVER TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS

CSA Driver Training

Commercial drivers need to be aware of the Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) enforcement model. Drivers along with motor carriers are evaluated and scored using this methodology.

Preventative Maintenance

A preventive maintenance program is one way a company can minimize its vehicle repair costs. Some companies make it costly for you to establish a program for preventative maintenance, but FMCSAFETY believes driver involvement is key when it comes to a successful preventative maintenance program and we include it in our trainings to you at no additional price. Because a driver spends the majority of his/her workday in a vehicle, he/she is often the first to notice a problem. This training course will address the importance of driver involvement in a preventative maintenance program: increasing the life of a vehicle, improving safety, and saving money over the lifetime of a vehicle.

Roadside Inspections

The Department of Transportation (DOT) estimates that there are three million roadside inspections take place each year. These safety checks provide yet another method to keep our nation’s highways safe for all motorists. The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is representative of state, federal, and provincial law enforcement agencies and the trucking industry in general, which applies not only to the United States, but also to Canada and Mexico. The CVSA has developed uniform inspection procedures and enforcement standards used by the DOT. There is a high probability of a driver being pulled over for a roadside inspection by a state or federal official who is following recommendations or standards in the execution of his or her job(s). Roadside inspections should not be a stressor for drivers, provided they have the up to date information they need and the vehicle is in good operating condition. For the driver who isn’t prepared or whose vehicle isn’t properly maintained, roadside inspections can turn into long-term delays. A vehicle or driver can be put out of service for receiving poor results from a single roadside inspection. If they find there are numerous violations and defects by one carrier, then a full-scale, in house compliance audit may result. Audits can be costly or even force the shut down of a trucking company. At the very least, they can seriously affect the company’s safety rating and result in bad public relations.

The Professional Driver

As the most visible representative of your company, each of your drivers has a responsibility to conduct himself/herself in a professional manner. This professionalism is important both when dealing with customers face to face and when behind the wheel. The goal of this lesson is to reinforce what is and isn’t expected of the professional driver. This training program will address the issue of driver professionalism, including internal customer service, external customer service, and image on the road.

Trip Planning

The idea behind trip planning is to design the most effective, efficient, safe, and legal route between two points. A well thought out trip plan can mean a savings of time and money for a driver and his/her company. A good plan can also mean a safe trip for the driver and the load he/she is hauling. A driver who has a solid plan before hitting the road is able to relax and devote all of his/her time to paying attention to the road. The driver who doesn’t plan has more than just driving on his/her mind. He/she is concerned about when and how he/she will arrive at his/her destination. This training program will focus on: 1) driver involvement in trip planning; 2) map reading; and 3) calculating time, fuel, and expenses.

Alcohol and Drugs

The Department of Transportation (DOT) issued drug and alcohol regulations to prevent accidents and injuries resulting from the misuse of alcohol or the use of controlled substances by the drivers of commercial motor vehicles. Drivers subject to the commercial driver’s license (CDL) standards, driving commercial motor vehicles, are subject to the alcohol and drug regulations in 49 CFR Part 382. A commercial motor vehicle is defined as: 1) Having a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds (11,794 kilograms) or more inclusive of a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds (4,536 kilograms); 2) Having a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds (11,794 kilograms) or more; 3) Designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver; or A vehicle of any size transporting hazardous materials of a type and quantity that require placarding. Part 382, Subpart F includes specific requirements for employer information and training. Employers must provide each driver with detailed information about the effects of alcohol and drugs, employer policies, testing requirements, and how and where drivers can get help for substance abuse.

Back Safety/Lifting

Sprains and strains are the most common causes of lower back pain. Lifting improperly is the largest single cause of back pain and injury. The use of proper lifting techniques can help prevent back pain and injury. This training program will focus on: 1) the common conditions that can lead to back pain; 2) the causes of back pain; 3) proper lifting techniques; and 4) what to do when back pain occurs.

Backing

Backing is one of the more difficult tractor-trailer skills a driver performs on a regular basis. Successfully backing a tractor-trailer requires patience and good judgment.

Driver Disqualification

It is important that everyone in your organization understand the disqualification requirements in Sec. 383.51 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) ― especially your drivers. A driver holding a commercial driver’s license (CDL) or commercial learner’s permit (CLP) can be disqualified from driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) if convicted of certain violations while driving any type of vehicle. This includes violations while operating a personal vehicle on personal time. This training program will address the driver disqualification regulations in Sec. 383.51 of the FMCSRs including what constitutes a disqualifying offense and the consequences associated with being convicted of a disqualifying offense. It also addresses the elimination of the practice of “masking” convictions by a state on a driver’s driving record.

Driver Logs

Keeping a record of duty status is one of the tasks a driver performs on a daily basis. Making sure it is legal and current can at times be difficult and/or confusing. This training program will review the basics of keeping an accurate, legal, and current driver’s log.

Entry Level Driver

The professional driver’s job comes with many responsibilities. As well as knowing how to safely operate a commercial motor vehicle, the professional driver is expected to handle a variety of other duties from handling cargo to customer service. In order to handle all of these responsibilities, it is important that your drivers understand the importance of operating safely, being a qualified driver, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. This training program will address the four critical topics mandated under the Part 380, Subpart E, Entry-Level Driver Training regulations: 1) Driver Qualification; 2) Driver Wellness; 3) Hours of Service; and 4) Whistleblower Protection.

Safety and Security

Safety and security have taken on new meaning in the trucking industry. Though this topic has always been important to carriers and drivers, recent events have placed a new emphasis on the subject. This session is not intended to place fear in your drivers’ minds, rather, stress the importance of vigilance when it comes to safety and security measures. This training session will address safety and security issues drivers face from the time they pick up a load until they deliver their cargo.

Slips/ Trips, and Falls

Though it may seem like a minor thing, a slip, trip, or fall should be taken seriously. The consequences may be more severe than you think. Something as simple as a driver missing a step into his/her cab, an icy parking lot, or a wet warehouse floor can cause an accident. This accident can result in an injury requiring time away from work.

Accident Procedures

Statistics show that traffic accidents affect about one out of every 12 people each year. When an unexpected accident occurs, a driver needs to know how to follow a set of procedures in order to safely and legally deal with the situation in a short period of time. This training program will address immediate response, information gathering, and the regulations regarding accident reporting.

Cargo Securement

Industry statistics continue to support the fact that a career as a professional driver is one of the most dangerous occupations a person can pursue. Cargo claims resulting from damaged and missing cargo result in over $200 million in lost revenue each year. But more importantly, unsecured, falling, and shifting cargo can hurt your company’s bottom line and cause accidents, injury, and even death. Proper cargo securement training can help reduce costly claims, accidents, and injuries. This training program will focus on cargo securement techniques.

Cornering Techniques

Though it is a maneuver performed several times a day, cornering techniques should be reviewed from time-to-time. This training program will review the basics or right turns, left turns, and curves.

Defensive Driving

The term defensive driving covers several driver training topics. This training program will address the basics of defensive driving, seeing and being seen, city driving, underpasses, intersections, and merging with traffic. Backing and cornering are covered in separate training programs.

Driving Grades

Driving grades presents several specific challenges for the professional driver. This training program will focus on maintaining proper vehicle speed and braking technique. There are many ways to approach teaching this subject. The approach that is taken in this training program is the one recommended in the commercial driver license manual distributed by several states. You may want to introduce this topic with the use of a video or slide presentation. Select a presentation that includes the types of vehicles your drivers operate. Also, make sure the techniques presented agree with your company’s policies and practices. Another way to introduce this topic is by distributing a newspaper clipping or two on an accident that involved a large vehicle on an upgrade, downgrade, or in a mountainous area. Make sure your drivers read the article either out loud or to themselves, then explain that this session is meant to review what driving techniques should be used when dealing with grades.

Emergency Maneuvers

The safest way to handle an emergency is to prevent it from happening. Most emergencies arise through driver error. When an emergency cannot be avoided a driver needs to know what maneuvers are best for the situation. This training program will address evasive steering, emergency braking, offroad recovery, brake failures, and tire blowouts.

Extreme Driving Conditions

Snow, fog, and ice are just some of the extreme driving conditions professional drivers deal with on a daily basis. Extreme driving conditions demand increased driver concentration and preparation. The purpose of this training program is to help drivers understand how to handle weather-related conditions they face while on the job.

Fire Prevention

Though it doesn’t happen often, a vehicle fire can be a dangerous and frightening experience. This training program will cover fire prevention, an overview of fire extinguishers, and fire fighting methods.

Hazard Perception

A hazard is any road condition or road user that can pose a potential danger to a motorist. The purpose of this training program is to introduce new drivers and remind veteran drivers of the hazards they face daily. This includes the nature of hazards and the clues to recognizing them.

Hours-of-Service

Experienced drivers should have a strong understanding of the hours of service regulations. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case. This training program is a review of the basic hours of service requirements found in Part 395 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), as they apply to property-carrying vehicles. For training related to passenger-carrying vehicles, refer to the training program titled “Hours of Service: Passenger-Carrying Vehicles.”

Increasing Fuel Mileage

How much fuel a carrier uses has become an issue that decides if a carrier remains profitable, or even if a carrier can remain in business. This training session is designed to present strategies for improving fuel mileage. These strategies apply to the drivers that operate the vehicles, and the maintenance personnel that takes care of them. While reducing the price of fuel is covered, it is only covered to emphasize to drivers the necessity of participating in company efforts to reduce overall fuel costs. There are other strategies that carrier management can use to reduce fuel costs, but these are not covered in this class. This session is strictly intended to present methods of improving fuel mileage to drivers and maintenance personnel.

Night Driving

Driving at night presents several challenges for the professional driver. Poor lighting, reduced visibility, and impaired (drunk) drivers are all potential hazards. The purpose of this training program is to address the three major elements of night driving (driver, roadway, and vehicle factors) and offer tips for safe nighttime travel.

Sharing The Highway

The focus of this training program is passing and being passed. Issues such as personal safety and driver professionalism are addressed in other portions of this training program.

Skid Control

Mother Nature’s unpredictability poses many challenges for the professional driver. Ice, snow, and sleet can force ever the best driver to skid and lose control of his/her vehicle.

Vehicle Breakdown and Road Repair

Even the best vehicle inspection and preventive maintenance program cannot prevent all vehicle breakdowns. Knowing what to do when a vehicle breaks down helps ensure the safety of the driver and others on the road. This training program will address what equipment a driver should carry on his/her vehicle and the steps he/she should take to ensure safety when his/her vehicle breaks down on the road.

Vehicle Inspections

Parts 392 and 396 of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR) address the subject of vehicle inspection. All motor carriers and drivers who operate commercial motor vehicles fall under these regulations. Part 396 of the FMCSR requires pre-trip and post-trip inspections on each vehicle a driver is assigned to drive. The idea behind the requirement is to put safer vehicles on the road as a way to help prevent accidents. A thorough inspection can also help a driver avoid mechanical breakdowns and unwanted “downtime.” This training program will address the basics or pre-trip and post-trip inspections as well as on the road inspection rules.